Istrazivanja i projektovanja za privreduJournal of Applied Engineering Science

OPTIMAL THERMAL SENSORS PLACEMENT BASED ON INDOOR THERMAL ENVIRONMENT CHARACTERIZATION BY USing CFD MODEL


DOI: 10.5937/jaes0-28985 
This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY 4.0
Creative Commons License

Volume 19 article 836 pages: 628-641

Faridah
Universitas Gadjah Mada, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics, Yogyakarta, Indonesia; Universitas Gadjah Mada, Graduate School, Doctorate Program in Enviromental Science, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Sentagi Sesotya Utami*
Universitas Gadjah Mada, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Ressy Jaya Yanti
Universitas Gadjah Mada, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Sunarno
Universitas Gadjah Mada, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Emilya Nurjani
Universitas Gadjah Mada, Graduate School, Doctorate Program in Enviromental Science, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Rony Wijaya
Universitas Gadjah Mada, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

This paper discusses an analysis to obtain the optimal thermal sensor placement based on indoor thermal characteristics. The method relies on the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation by manipulating the outdoor climate and indoor air conditioning (AC) system. First, the alternative sensor's position is considered the optimum installation and the occupant's safety. Utilizing the Standardized Euclidean Distance (SED) analysis, these positions are then selected for the best position using the distribution of the thermal parameters' values data at the activity zones. Onsite measurement validated the CFD model results with the maximum root means square error, RMSE, between both data sets as 0.8°C for temperature, the relative humidity of 3.5%, and an air velocity of 0.08m/s, due to the significant effect of the building location. The Standardized Euclidean Distance (SED) analysis results are the optimum sensor positions that accurately, consistently, and have the optimum % coverage representing the thermal condition at 1,1m floor level. At the optimal positions, actual sensors are installed and proven to be valid results since sensors could detect thermal variables at the height of 1.1m with SED validation values of 2.5±0.3, 2.2±0.6, 2.0±1.1, for R15, R33, and R40, respectively.

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This research is supported by the Indonesian Ministry of Higher Education and Technology through a funding scheme PTUPT No. 2925/UN1.DITLIT/D IT-LIT/PT/2020 and Universitas Gadjah Mada Indonesia. The author would also like to thank Integrated Smart and Green Building (Insgreeb) Research Group and PT. Amakusa for their support throughout the developing process and testing of the system in this research.


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